22R Barbeque

KYOTA

New member
Well here we go, after all the atempts to make my carbed 22R run at angles, I finally got sick of it stalling and trying to restart the flooded engine in hairy situations. I came upon the article in the August 05 OFF-ROAD of the propane conversion on a 22R by gotpropane.com. My mind was racing "oh hell yeah!! thats the answer I've been looking for!!" I must've read that article a half dozen times. So I started to research it in depth, searching on Pirate, and finally called Cary at gotpropane. Cary answered all my questions and explained everything about the advantages of propane, so I ordered the kit for my 22R. The kit showed up and I unboxed everything and laid it out
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then I got to work removing all the un-needed carb stuff
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heres the pile I ended up with not including the gas tank that I removed earlier
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KYOTA

New member
The next step was to remove the original base plate off the carb
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the throttle lnkage is needed with the new mixer
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the base plate is then bolted onto the mixer
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and the whole assembly is bolted back onto the manifold.
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KYOTA

New member
Now its time to plumb the regulator, the two outside brass fittings are for water in and out and you can see the filter into the solenoid then into the regulator in the middle.
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the kit doesnt come with a bracket for the regulator so I whipped one up using a piece of 2"x 1/4" flat bar and bolted the regulator to the inner fender
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regulator and mixer in place everything is looking good
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then its time to connect the vapor hose from the regulator to the mixer
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KYOTA

New member
Time to measure and make up the fuel delivery lines, the kit includes all the fittings you need
making up the short line that goes from the bulkhead to the tank
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fuel line from tank to regulator run along the old fuel lines
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KYOTA

New member
Tank mounted in with the brackets provided in the kit, what a better place to pimp a big Marlin sticker? "Powered by Marlin!"
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solenoid wired to a keyed on source filters installed and everything else under the hood is buttoned up
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KYOTA

New member
the moment of truth, I hop in start pumpin on the 'ol go pedal and realized "hey dumbass, we aint runnin no carb no mo!" I laughed at my self and hit the key, it took it a second for the propane to get from A to B but then it fired! yeah!
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This thing runs way smoother than before and it will idle down to around 250-300. I still need to take it out and adjust the timing and mixture screw on the mixer for the most performance. So there you have it, Give Cary a call at http://www.gotpropane.com/p1.html he'll hook you up. Thanks Cary! :beer:
 

MR.ROCKAPE

New member
Denis said:
hmm, i wonder if someone have a kit fopr Jeep 4.0?
Arent all 4.0s injected??Why would you want to go away from FI??
Now if you have a carbed engine then why not.Also you will lose some performance(over all power)with propane unless you build a high compression engine for it.
 

KYOTA

New member
Talking with Cary (owner of gotpropane) he said more power, propane is higher octane 100-110. and the throttle response is unreal compared to the old carb. we''l see though when I take it out to tune it.
 

MR.ROCKAPE

New member
What does octane rating have to do with power??All the octane rating means is that the higher the number say 100-110 octane is its resistance to spark knock(resistance to preignition).The higher the # the SLOWER it burns.This is why if your rig is supposed to run on 87 it is a waste of money to use higher octane fuel(It usually can hurt power slightly).
I am sure you will be able to crank a lot more timing in it ,but unless you are going to add at least 2 points of compression(by milling the head or a piston change)it will make less power.But if your carb was so worn out it may make more power.
Propane produces less BTUs than gasoline in the combustion process.
Im not saying that the gain of the ability to run upside down and the cost arent excellent traits off road.
 

Norm the Big

Active member
What do you think would be a good compression ratio for propane Rockape?
I'm considering this some day since it'd cost about a grand to get a good FI system going anyway. I like the simplicity of carbs. Propane looks just as simple. My autolite 2150 hasn't hickuped yet but time will tell.

Does anyone know a good place to get tanks and what sizes they would come in? I'd probably mount two in the stock 32 gal tank location mounting them inside a skid plate flat with the bottom of the frame. I'd also like to fab something up to run it off a 5 gal tank just in case.
 
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MR.ROCKAPE

New member
At this alititude probably 11.0 or 12.0 to 1.That should give you about the same performance as a 9-9.5 to 1 gas engine.Now fuel mileage my be a concern if this is a daily driver,I would get a large tank for the truck you want to convert.
Personally,I would add a TBI set-up and stay with gas,but this is my opinion just because after you figure in the cost of a propane set-up and building an engine for it to perform as well as it did on gas you would be in it more.
Again ,I am not bashing propane for a strictly off-road stand point ,just for all around use.
 

Norm the Big

Active member
Do you know where I could get a friggin big tank? say about 40-60 gallons that would fit. How hard are these suckers to fill?
 

MR.ROCKAPE

New member
I think if you contact the place that comes out and fills the propane tanks on the back of peoples houses they have all the info, including kits that are usually cheaper than the propane kits that are advertised.They should be able to get you any tank size you need.
 

Norm the Big

Active member
I'll stop by a place in Carson I know of on Goni Ln and ask them. I still have some wheelin with my carb to do before I place the final verdict. probably the worst part of this conversion is all the space the tank takes up.
 

Propane

New member
Hey all, I'm Cary fron gotpropane. Nice bulletin board guys! Nice to see a little less harshness on the bb's.

Well lets see, how can a 'pane motor make more power with the same comp ratio? Lets take the 22r for example. With the removal of the venturis and choke plates, the air flow volume is greatly increased. Even though the motor wasn't made to burn 'pane, the octane does help by bieng able to advance timing. On paper, 'pane has less btu and such, but in the actual running of the motor, most 22r drivers feel a noticeable difference in power. Not promising anything as each truck is different. I will say that I have NEVER recieved a phone call from a customer saying where's my power? I get the opposite! Drunken calls in the middle of the night from customers that have just come back from a wheeling trip and just had to call.(one guy woke me up just as my ice maker line broke and was spraying everywhere) If you've ever driven a dual fuel late model fuel injected conversion, you should have experienced similar power to gas. These kits are highly restrictive . The reason they fare well is that the computer is now told to highly advance the timing. The 258 Jeep motor also. I don't know if the motors just ran so bad on the original carb or what, but EVERY ONE of those the customer has noted a definate increase in power. I think It's the airflow and the timing. You also don't need all those vacuum lines to control egr and such which is a power robber to prevent high nox. Nox is created when the cylinder temp gets too high. Propane is such high octane that it usually won't ping unless the dist. is set too high. That's why it's also good for turbocharging or supercharging a stock compression motor.
Sometimes it doesn't make sense why something works, when theoretically it doesn't. In many cases in the automotive industry ( we also own an auto repair shop) some things don't make sense they just work.
A word about tanks. If running a tank underneath, you will want to find a used motorfuel tank that is designed to be mounted underneath. They are permenantly mounted to the truck and have a remote fill that needs to be installed. They don't make many new tanks anymore and they are expensive . Used, they can be had very cheap because the parts yards cannot crush them :D Our kits are designed to use forklift tanks because they are strong, removeable, hold enough fuel for the 4 and 6 cylinder guys and enough for trail only v8 motors. Our kits are not epa approved, So not street legal in cali.
These were designed for the average guy to put on in a day and look like a pro. They are for folks who have had it with the carb and are ready for an alternative. The other option is e.f.i. E.f.i. is not simple to put on and tune. Most guys that like carbs like simplicity. This blows even the trusty old carb away!
Thanks for having me here :wave:
 

KYOTA

New member
rockape said:
At this alititude probably 11.0 or 12.0 to 1.That should give you about the same performance as a 9-9.5 to 1 gas engine..

Propane is not affected by altitude
 
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