Brizzman's 'Cruizer

Brizzman

Active member
Premium Member
I've got the 'Cruizer on the road! :thumbsup: (30 day movement permit for now) It needed a bit of steering rework and lights when I got it.

Here it is at the end of it's shakedown run on HLT.



It's a '72 Toyota FJ-40 with a 307 SBC, SM465, and NP205. It's sitting on a D44 front with a GM posi, a D60 rear with a Detroit locker, 4.56 gears, and 37" Boggers.
 

Brizzman

Active member
Premium Member
It has a GM tilt steering column, with Saginaw power steering and high steer. When I got it the steering arms were longer than the mis-keyed Pittman arm, and the steering radius just wouldn't cut it.

I got a longer Waggy steering arm, that was keyed to point almost straight back. Here's a comparison of the lengths and angles of the old and new arms.



Then I cut down the old drag link and welded in a new bung.



Add lights and it was ready for the road. :D
 

Brizzman

Active member
Premium Member
I like the upgrade Brizz :mouth_water::thumbsup:
Thanks.

:thumbsup:Looks great. I'm always amazed at the capabillity of proper leaf spring setups.
Thanks. :D I was pretty happy with the flex. The front is much better than the rear though. I think there are scissor shackles in it's future.

someone was telling me about this thing the other day

badass! you still have your jeep too?
Yeah, I still have the XJ, but it has some suspension issues. It leans to the passenger side a lot. Once I get the FJ squared away, the Jeep is getting some attention. ;)
 

fj4play

New member
looks great brizz, it would be a good idea to change the front hose and tubing set up for the front brakes , did you also install the proportioning valve for the rear brakes
 

Brizzman

Active member
Premium Member
Well, after some breakage, fuel problems, and some things I simply think I can make better, I'm tearing the FJ down to rework some things.

One of the outboarded spring hangers came off the frame on the 'Con.


For that I'm planning on either making my own or getting one of the vendors here to make a nice strong pair. Then they will be welded on instead of bolted. ;) The rear spring hangers will get welded too. I may try to push the rear axle back a few inches if it's not too difficult. The rear drive shaft is extremely short. If I want to get more flex out of the rear I will need to address that.

The fuel cell had foam baffles in it and pieces of foam were breaking loose and clogging up the fuel filter and fuel lines. That may even have ruined a fairly new fuel pump. So I drained the tank and pulled out the foam baffles. That was a pain, the only way to get them out was through the 3" holes for the fill and the fuel level sending unit. I had to recruit Amber with her smaller hands to help with that. :D Then I removed the tank. I'm going to have to vacuum out the tank to get all the little bits of foam out. I want to add another fuel outlet and Walbro pickups, but I'm not sure if that will work in this tank/cell. I'm also going to try to find a better gas cap assembly for it. Anyone have any suggestions?

I have an in-line electric fuel pump to go in it when the tank goes back in.

Next on the list is to get some steel shims for the front axle. It had aluminum bolt in shims to correct the caster. Well, one of them broke in half, then fell out. I had the same thing happen on my XJ, too. :( I need some steel ones I can weld in place. I don't think the aluminum ones are a good idea for a rig that gets any rough treatment. They didn't hold up for me.

There are a few other things I may do while I have things apart. A new cross member and some tub repair come to mind right now.
 

wrenchjunkie

New member
Be careful vacuuming the tank. It doesn't take much fuel vapor to turn your shopvac into a smoking, ruptured plastic hulk spilling all the other stuff in it on the floor and leaving you without a vacuum to clean it up.
 

Brizzman

Active member
Premium Member
Be careful vacuuming the tank. It doesn't take much fuel vapor to turn your shopvac into a smoking, ruptured plastic hulk spilling all the other stuff in it on the floor and leaving you without a vacuum to clean it up.
Thanks for posting that. It' wasn't just fumes in the tank, there was probably a cup or 2 of gas that didn't come out as well. I flushed the tank out with water, and then vacuumed it all out. Less fumes and the shop vac didn't melt. The tank is all cleaned and ready for me to figure out how to install the Walbro pickups. :knokwood:

I'm sure a big part of the fuel problem was the shape of the tank. It's sitting with the front side up in the pics.



It's 40" wide, 28" front to back, and only 7" deep. When it's not completely full of gas, it doesn't have to be very far off camber for the fuel level to be below the pickup point. It needs at least 2 Walbro pickups to fix this. The electric fuel pump will give an almost instant indication of whether or not it's picking up gas (as opposed to cranking the engine for 30 seconds to a minute to find out). Anyone here have any experience with installing Walbro pickups?


It looks a little dirty
It's cleaner now (it's rained since those pics were taken), but aren't they supposed to be dirty? :D
 

Brizzman

Active member
Premium Member
Well, it looks like the tank will have to be cut open to install the pickups. There just isn't enough room to work inside it. :( If that's the case I'd like to have some kind of removable access for future maintenance. Who's good with aluminum tanks? Calling Dr. Smash?
 

Brizzman

Active member
Premium Member
I got the tank (fuel cell) back from Dr Smash a while ago. He cut an access hole in it, closed off a hole that won't be needed and put in some attachment points to hold two Walbro pickups in place. I got a flush mount fuel fill from summit, and he installed that in the access hole cover, which is held on by a bunch of nutserts. He also installed a new vent tube in the corner.

Here's what the tank looks like now.


And one with the cover plate off.


For those of you who don't know what Walbro pickups are, they are a wheeling rigs best friend (especially if the rig has a poorly designed tank). They use surface tension to close off a pickup that is above the level of fuel in the tank. The pickup just has to be wet with gas, not under it. I installed one in the front right and one in the rear left. As long as one of them is under the fuel level, the engine will get gas.

I installed the Walbros with a combination of submersible rubber fuel line and aluminum hard line. The submersible rubber line is about $25 a foot, so I used about 3-4 feet of the aluminum line to save some $$$.



Hopefully 2 Walbros will be enough. If not, I'll have to get 1 or 2 more.
 
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