Fire Extinguisher Mounting

Spence621

New member
I mounted a fire extinguisher on the right of my console. Used 3 #14x 1" sheet metal screws to mount the bracket. A little finicky working around the carpet and padding, but it worked. Should I be concerned about its strength, say in an accident or sudden stop? Is there anything I could have done differently/Better? Thanks :D
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bracket

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plenty of legroom.

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RockRunner02

New member
Thats almost right where my cb is. There really isnt a lot of room up front for stuff. I have a extinguisher mounted in the back on the storage door. I'll mount one in front on the roll cage when its done. Hey now you have a good excuse to not let fat girls ride in front!
 

Spence621

New member
Thats almost right where my cb is. There really isnt a lot of room up front for stuff. I have a extinguisher mounted in the back on the storage door. I'll mount one in front on the roll cage when its done. Hey now you have a good excuse to not let fat girls ride in front!

I was just worried about the bracket, or else I would have put it back there. I was worried that it a sudden stop it would fly off and dome me haha. And that's always a good excuse to have haha.
 

Spence621

New member
You did really good by mounting it up front. Its with in reach of the driver which is ideal. The only thing I'd recomend is when you can afford it buy a bracket like this http://www.polyperformance.com/shop...-Release-Fire-Extinguisher-Mount-p-20655.html the plastic ones that come with the extinguishers are generally pretty crappy and always come loose which like you say could be an issue in a wreck or rollover.
Thanks, I thought it turned out pretty nicely. I put there also because it wouldn't go far if it came loose, at least theoretically. Maybe I should put a hose clamp around it for extra measure?
 

Gizmatical Fuquad

Well-known member
Premium Member
Thanks, I thought it turned out pretty nicely. I put there also because it wouldn't go far if it came loose, at least theoretically. Maybe I should put a hose clamp around it for extra measure?

Yeah, put a hose clamp on it so you can't get it out when you need it NOW!

I think how you have will work fine, I prefer to have them in reach as I am belted in the driver's seat. I have dealt with a few vehicle fires over the years and can tell you from experience, the quicker you can deploy it the better.
 

Spence621

New member
Yeah, put a hose clamp on it so you can't get it out when you need it NOW!

I think how you have will work fine, I prefer to have them in reach as I am belted in the driver's seat. I have dealt with a few vehicle fires over the years and can tell you from experience, the quicker you can deploy it the better.

True, it would be very awkward to get loose.
What were the causes of them?
 

CashMoney

I piss excellence.
agreed a hose clamp would not be good. Thats why I suggested that other bracket since its still a super solid mount but takes 2 seconds to remove when needed
 

POOR BOY

New member
do your self a favor and invest in a haylon (sp) extinguisher, drychems are known to "pack" when going off road and after my dad damn near died in a loader fire because every extinguisher was packed and didnt shoot when drawn and yes all the guages on the bottles said good. i have heard of people say every so often you can take a drychem upside down and hit it to unpack the powder inside which helps. a rig fire is bad, finding your extinguisher wont work is worse.

EDIT: they might make drychems that are less prone to packing as well
 

maxamillion2345

Well-known member
I've had the same cheap style extinguisher mounted in the bed cubby of my Taco using the same cheap mount for over a year. It's held on like a champ. I knew what the right thing was but after Steve's post though I'll probably mount a clean guard or the foam kind in the cab as well.
 

Fyresq

New member
Two things to note - a fire extinguisher is really only good for a couple of years no matter what the gauge says because of the packing as poorboy mentioned. Commercial occupancies have to have them serviced every year by law. cooking hoods are required every 6 months.

Second - my biggest concern with where you mounted it is someone kicking it or if it comes loose, having it discharge. Believe me, it's not pretty when an extinguisher discharges inside a cab while your driving. At least make sure that it has a good strong pin it.
 

CashMoney

I piss excellence.
Two things to note - a fire extinguisher is really only good for a couple of years no matter what the gauge says because of the packing as poorboy mentioned. Commercial occupancies have to have them serviced every year by law. cooking hoods are required every 6 months.

Second - my biggest concern with where you mounted it is someone kicking it or if it comes loose, having it discharge. Believe me, it's not pretty when an extinguisher discharges inside a cab while your driving. At least make sure that it has a good strong pin it.
That has happened quite a few times in our Peterbilts and the extinguishers use the same plastic snap mount on most of them. thats partly why I said at least down the road to get a stronger mount. Do you have and mounts you'd recomend since you see them every day?
 

maxamillion2345

Well-known member
I think primarily either flammable liquids drip (leak) onto super hot engine components and combust or electrical fires.
 
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maxamillion2345

Well-known member
I do have kind of a lot wired to my battery, but I used in-line fuses and everything, should that be okay?

With the proper fuse and wiring to match you should be okay. I believe.

I refer to this
http://www.tacomaworld.com/forum/technical-chat/103969-electronics-basics-reference.html

So how do you know what wire gauge and fuse to use? You need to figure out the maximum current your accessory will draw. However, lights (for example) are rated in Watts not Amps...so here's how to calculate current draw from wattage...

Let's assume that this light bulb is a 130W bulb. Recall the two formulas P=VI and V=IR. The power rating of the bulb (130W) is in reference to its operating voltage (12V). Therefore, from P=VI...130=12*I, solving for I=10.8 Amps. Now, using this new information, plug it into Ohms law (V=IR) to determine the resistance of the light bulb.... 12=10.8*R, solving for R=1.11 ohms. For simplicity, it is reasonable to assume that the bulb's resistance doesn't change.

Now we're interested in knowing the worst-case scenario for the current draw. This is important because as we all know, the battery voltage fluctuates as it gets old or charges/discharges. Assume that the battery could be anywhere between 8 volts and 14 volts. Therefore, using ohm's law (V=IR)... 8=I*1.11, solving for I=7.2 A. Now do the same for 14V... 14=I*1.11, solving for I=12.6A.

Therefore, one 130W bulb draws anywhere from 7.2A to 12.6A depending on the state of your battery voltage. Since you typically have two bulbs, and each bulb draws 12.6A, the total draw of both bulbs on the battery is 25.2A (12.6+12.6=25.2). Therefore, we must select all components sufficient enough to handle this load.

Next, we'll need to add a fuse. As previously mentioned, the fuse is meant to protect the wires from burning up and starting a fire. The fuse capacity should be selected so that it burns up ("blows") before the wire burns up, but capable of handling the typical current load for long periods of time. A good rule of thumb is to select a fuse that is 10% below the wire's ampacity. For example, since we've selected a 10 gauge wire that can handle 30A, the fuse should be 10% below that...30A-(30*10%)=27A fuse. The closest standard fuse to this is 25A. However, remember that we could potentially see a 25.2A max draw if the car battery is up around 14V, but since this is highly unlikely, selecting a fuse at 25A is better than picking a 30A fuse that doesn't blow before the wire.

WARNING: always physically place a fuse as close to the battery as possible. This is because if you have a few feet of wire in between the battery and the fuse, a short could occur in the unprotected length of wire resulting in a possible fire.

V (Volts) = I (Amps) * R (ohms)
Power (Watts) = V (Volts) * I (Amps)

10 gauge - 30 Amps
12 gauge - 20 Amps
14 gauge - 15 Amps
16 gauge - 10 Amps
18 gauge - 7 Amps *
20 guage - 6 Amps *

another good link for determining which size wire to run:
http://www.skingco.com/portable_power/wiring_size_chart.htm
 
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CashMoney

I piss excellence.
even with a fuse i've still seen fires happen when wires rub on bare steel. Make sure everythings protected well and it will lesson the chance of fire.
 
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