Guess what this is?

Dennis

Administrator
Staff member
:yup:

DSCF0979.jpg
 

kairo

Moderator
Staff member
Denis said:
but what about the aluminum piece? :yup:

it's a thing on the end of all the synth ropes that allows you to hook a D ring or something too it, and it prevents the cable from going through the fairlead and gumming everything up
 

Connect

New member
A sythetic winch cable that magically hooks itself up to any part of a truck???

Damn if only...

Seriously though it looks like you can fit a tow hook right through it nice and snugly.
 

PizzaJeep

Active member
oooh pretty denis! thats that thing thats made by someone like redneck concepts... it stops the lead from going through the fairlead
 

Zebaru

New member
It isn't a cable, and I would hesitate to call it a rope...

The line is probably an amsteel blue or similar Sk75 Dyneema right? Altough there are a ton of interesting newer lines out there like vectran (LCP) and Pobon (PBO) - I still like the Dyneema as a winch line because of it's low cost, (relative) UV stability, and one of its big knocks - creep - isn't much of a factor in this application. Altough Vectran offers some serious abrasion resistance advantages - proper use of a chafe guard could probably make that a non-issue as well. FWIW, Dyneema also floats.

An enclosed thimble like that would be a ***** to splice in. Do yourself a favor and sieze and whip the splice - you can already see that the bury has shifted a bit. Keep an eye on the taper - especially if you didn't have a pro do the splicing.

High-tech lines are our friends - wire rope sucks. Huge weight savings, strength gains, and safety benefits.

Travis
 

Dennis

Administrator
Staff member
it was very easy to splice it, you do have to have the rope completely off the drum though. the rope is Amsteel Blue. it's never been under load yet, so the splice hasn't stretched out yet.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
Took a while to find the right info. Looks like steel rope is about half the cost, 3/8 has a break strength of around 15000 compared to the 20400 for amsteel. To get that strength in steel you have to go to 7/16, about 10% higher cost than 3/8, of course you would also get less 7/16 on the winch drum.
 

Zebaru

New member
Yeah, those twelve strands splice easy enough - its just that with a brummel like that you have to pull all 80' back through itself. If you had an open thimble, you could do it with just one end...

Although the machined aluminum piece is cool, you could accomplish the same thing with a nice stainless thimble and a stopper ball (or similar) for about seven dollars - probably less if you shopped around.

A couple of downsides to the synthetic line is its relative lack of abrasion resistance, UV issues, and the difficulty in inspecting it. For instance - how can you tell that it has lost 25% of its strength due to UV degredation? Minor issues in my opinion...

If I ever get a winch, it will be loaded with synthetic.

Travis
 

dye_dan

New member
How does synthetic handle water and mud? When I move back up to Washington I'll be muddin A LOT. At least UV degradation isn't much of a problem up there :)
 

Zebaru

New member
I guess I was totally overworking the UV stability issue. For winch applications, UV degredation is a non-issue really. SK-75 is pretty UV resistant in its natural state, and the lines are typically coated to enhance the stability. Anyway, what would it matter if you lost 5% of the strength of a line that is already rated to 200+% of the capacity of the winch?

Now, for yachts agressively downsizing lines and utilizing a high percentage of the rated strengths of the lines, 5% can become an issue. Of course, most of those guys have enough money that they just replace their lines every season anyway.

Travis
 
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