Overland/Camping tip of the day.

Air Sierra

Moderator
Staff member
Ok lets here some new idea's for camping and Overland travel.

This is one we use when were out with Camping.

When you have kids and they need to use the bathroom at night its nice to have light already to go, plus its nice in case you hear the "noise's" out side your tent in the middle of the night. Plus it is even nice to just have your camp light up at night.

Our camping tip: We buy the Solar landscaping lights they work great as night lights!

We buy the spot or flood lights instead of the side walk lights. Then we charge them up and keep them in the sun with the switch off, so when we go camping they are ready to go. Then we set them up around our camp (we use about 4 lights) so they will illuminate all around our camp. This also makes it nice so you don't have to run your lantern for long periods of time. they will last about 8-10 hours of good solid light and start to dim out near sunrise.

We by the cheap ones, so we can put them in our yard at the end of the season: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=95388
 

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rusty_tlc

New member
We use the square plastic juice jugs filled with water and frozen instead of cube ice. Your food stays dry and the blocks last a lot longer than cubes. Plus you always have an emergency supply of water on hand.


We also use the two cooler method. One cooler with frozen food in it that gets open once a day. The other with drinks and lunch/dinner in it.
 

Air Sierra

Moderator
Staff member
We use the square plastic juice jugs filled with water and frozen instead of cube ice. Your food stays dry and the blocks last a lot longer than cubes. Plus you always have an emergency supply of water on hand.


We also use the two cooler method. One cooler with frozen food in it that gets open once a day. The other with drinks and lunch/dinner in it.

Good info!

I agree on the frozen water jugs, we had to rescue a rig due to busted radiator, we just followed him out and used our spare water from our jugs.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
Tip for today.
A small refillable propane tank is easier to pack and will run a stove and lantern for a long weekend. Even considering the initial cost of the tank you will save money in the long run and not generate a bunch of empty green cylinders that end up in a landfill.
 

RARECJ8

Well-known member
Tip for today.
A small refillable propane tank is easier to pack and will run a stove and lantern for a long weekend. Even considering the initial cost of the tank you will save money in the long run and not generate a bunch of empty green cylinders that end up in a landfill.


northern tool sells an adapter to refill those green bottles from your home BBQ tank. I've reused those for years with great success. http://reviews.northerntool.com/0394/17264/reviews.htm


Another thing: people always ask me what one or two things should a camper never forget. The best answer is to bring a pencil and paper to write down the things you forgot. This way you can add it to your camp box when u get home. Aluminum foil, paper towels and zip lock bags are priceless when needed. Like rusty, i use the two cooler system with great success, altho the ARB helps a lot to keep drink ice at the ready for many days on the trail long after cooler-based ice is now murky mystery water. Pre-cooking as much food as possible and freezing before hand really cuts cooking time on the trail. (= more time to play and uses less gas). We also use with success a food vacuum sealing device. Pre cook spaghetti or cooked, sliced tri-tip, or whatever, put into a vacuum sealed bag, then freeze it. Then defrost and warm in a skillet or drop bag into boiling water, slice open and instant hot, cooked meal in a fraction of the time it would take to cook all that in camp. Less mess, especially for bacon, sausage, etc. Use of tupperware for food and related items keeps inside of cooler clean and organized.

So more than one overland tip from me today. :)

mb


edit: let's not forget the slotted trash bags-- it allows camp refuse to dry out and is easily managed. Plastic trash bags just bake the garbage, etc and attract flies, is smelly, etc. We avoid glass on the trail unless absolutely necessary (wine and spirits). For all else, aluminum and plastic can be crushed for the trash bag and take up less space. Bottles cannot be consolidated and must be managed for breakage and the like.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
A collapsible bucket is handy to have they take up very little room and are useful for everything from hauling water to doing dishes.

I carry a 5Gal Coleman jug, the kind that sits flat on it's side and has a spigot. I set it on a folding table or bumper along with a squirt bottle of camp soap and one of those cheap terry cloth towels at breaks. It's really nice to have a place to wash your hands before lunch after stacking rocks and hauling tow straps/winch lines. I try to stow the jug where it will be in the sun so the water gets nice and warm. In camp I put it on a folding table with a bucket under the spout to prevent forming a mud bog.
 

Air Sierra

Moderator
Staff member
Another idea for washing your hands is get some knee high pantyhose and drop a bar of soap in it. Then just tie it to you water jug that is laying on it side, so you don't lose your soap or have to set it in the dirt. You just get the soap wet while in the hose and rub your hands with it. Works great!
Then just throw the the hose into a zip lock bag so its ready for next time.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
Another idea for washing your hands is get some knee high pantyhose and drop a bar of soap in it. Then just tie it to you water jug that is laying on it side, so you don't lose your soap or have to set it in the dirt. You just get the soap wet while in the hose and rub your hands with it. Works great!
Then just throw the the hose into a zip lock bag so its ready for next time.

Depending on where you are that may be okay. I prefer to use the biodegradable camp soap on trails in the Sierra.
 

rundovr

New member
I'll throw in my two cents. I hunt alot and camp is a small one/two person tent I place an led red flashing light on the top of the tent when I head out if you get turned around and can not see much that red light is visible for miles when u go to a high place use your compass to get you going in the right direction and watch for the light. I also carry in my pack the light sticks that when you pop them they glow it saves my flash lights and yet puts of enough light that you dont run into a cliff or worse a female bear with cubs at that time make sure you are hunting with some one you can out run jj hope to see some out camping in the remote areas this year stop at the tent with the red light and we will talk and feed ya.
 

WILLD420

Well-known member
Premium Member
We used to overnight a lot in bear country while working on ranches. We would tie our horses to short logs that they could drag if a bear got after them. A half rotten log was best since it would break apart if they started running real hard. Then we would take the horse panels and build a square pen around our sleeping bags at night.

Usually the horses would wake us up, but once in awhile you'd hear something that would wake you up and you could smell them close by. The panels give quite a bit of protection in case one wanted to come say hi in the middle of the night.
 

Inc

Moderator
Staff member
I always bring baby/disinfectant wipes for long hot trips. If you aren't anywhere near a place that you can wash up, they work great in place of a shower after a number days in the heat and dust.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
We used to overnight a lot in bear country while working on ranches. We would tie our horses to short logs that they could drag if a bear got after them. A half rotten log was best since it would break apart if they started running real hard. Then we would take the horse panels and build a square pen around our sleeping bags at night.

Usually the horses would wake us up, but once in awhile you'd hear something that would wake you up and you could smell them close by. The panels give quite a bit of protection in case one wanted to come say hi in the middle of the night.
On a similar note.
Last Friday night I was cooking bacon at Wentworth Springs. I made sure to change my Tee shirt before bed. You really don't want to go to sleep in bear country smelling like rumki.:D The next day we saw bear tracks near Rubicon Springs. :eek: When in bear country never sleep in clothes you cook in and be sure not to have them in your tent.
 

CashMoney

I piss excellence.
I always bring baby/disinfectant wipes for long hot trips. If you aren't anywhere near a place that you can wash up, they work great in place of a shower after a number days in the heat and dust.

they work great as mountain man money too
 
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