Spider Excavator Work Done on Cadillac Hill, not good

Simple Man

Member
The Tahoe National Forest just did some work on Cadillac Hill. They had a Spider Excavator building rolling dips and closed a few short sections of trail.

A full write up and lots of pictures on my website: www.TheOtherRubicon.com

I'm sure at some point I will need our membership to send emails and make phone calls.

I'll keep you informed.

Just one example...


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RARECJ8

Well-known member
Premium Member
The Tahoe National Forest just did some work on Cadillac Hill. They had a Spider Excavator building rolling dips and closed a few short sections of trail.

A full write up and lots of pictures on my website: www.TheOtherRubicon.com

I'm sure at some point I will need our membership to send emails and make phone calls.

I'll keep you informed.

Just one example...


View attachment 59041


Was that tree broken over with correct permits, dust abatement and EIS report?
 

RARECJ8

Well-known member
Premium Member
Those areas, meh. What does need attention is between morris rock to the lower big hair pin. Trail is slowly stuffing away. Walk it and look up, the original route is a mere trace that suffered the effects of erosion. This section needs erosion abatement.
 

WILLD420

Well-known member
Maybe you could explain some of your statements a little. The removal of the rock in the trail leaving a big hole for one. Maybe I am wrong but the work they were doing looks like a precursor to better work. I can understand the issue of not communicating, that is a government thing. What I don’t get is how negative you appear to be when some of the work was good and some is probably needed but you didn’t like the way it was done. Maybe explain a little more about how the loose dirt could have been made better. Maybe show some examples of better work. Perhaps there is an established USFS standard that wasn’t met?

For all the talk of communicating, you seem to be attacking awfully hard and while I am grateful for your level of engagement I am concerned that being so negative may lead people to the wrong conclusions and undo the MOU progress.
 

Simple Man

Member
Basically, the TNF got ahead of themselves. I'm not opposed to this type of work being done but you shouldn't start what you can't finish. They started the project but didn't finish it (before winter storms) by rock lining the bottom of the rolling dip and by hardening and compacting the berm to prevent erosion. If it had all been done at the same time, I'd be good with it.

Joe was also ready to close sections of side trails that had been in place for almost 40 years, without user input. I was not able to talk him out of closing other much shorter sections of trail. I really didn't like being in the position of being asked to decide what to keep open and what to close. That should never be one person's decision. I was able to get Joe to postpone the closure of certain sections.

The agencies in charge are in the middle of agreeing and signing an MOU about maintenance and the TNF went ahead without abiding by the rules in the MOU. Part of that was reaching out to and including the other agencies, the users and volunteers about to get their input. That never happened.

As for a better example, El Dorado County has been doing maintenance on the Rubicon within El Dorado County for years, with their work meeting the scrutiny of the Central Valley Water Authority. Vickie Sanders of El Dorado County drove this MOU. She has been the grant getter and has overseen the maintenance for more than a decade. Joe Chavez left her out of the planning for this project.

When El Dorado County started in on trail work to get the Clean Up and Abatement order lifted, everyone was worried that they would pave the trail. Pulling a single rock out of the center of the trail could be considered paving. The work at Potato Patch could be considered paving. When El Dorado County was finished, although it's an ongoing process, MOST users understand and agree with the work done and don't consider it paving.

Joe Chavez and the TNF does not have the experience or skills of OHV trail maintenance that El Dorado County has. The MOU should be rewritten giving El Dorado the lead in trail maintenance across the entire Rubicon.
 
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Simple Man

Member
A few more examples of better work came to mind. Several years ago, the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit did a major rebuild of the Middle Fork Trail up Blackwood Canyon. They used dg and create some HUGE roiling dips. So huge you don't know you're driving over them. It's like the trail is just a series of rollers. Probably not practical for the Rubicon with the heavy equipment and amount of material require but done right.

The other example is Eldorado NF, not El Dorado County, working on the Richardson Lake Trail up to Sourdough Hill. This was part of the 42 trail closures for that were claimed to be damaging meadows. The Eldorado brought in dg, actually, we the uses brought in dg. The FS brought in a gas powered compactor. We put down some dg, they compacted it. Some water was added to the dg and they compacted it again. This went on slowly building up the berm. We built on at the cabin lower down on the trail and a smaller one much further up the trail before you cross the PCT.

It is possible to do this work correctly. You just have to want to do it right.
 
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