Survival Myths... Debunked

TwinStick

New member
Has anyone even tried lighting one of the waterproof matches? I haven't bought them in years. The ones I tried had a thick protective coating which almost made it impossible to strike a flame. I really think the only way I could light them was by lighting a standard match first...:rolleyes:

I like to find big grubs and bite into them just like Bear does. :thumbsup:

I like his attitude, no bsing.
 

72 Virginians

New member
Staff member
Has anyone even tried lighting one of the waterproof matches? I haven't bought them in years. The ones I tried had a thick protective coating which almost made it impossible to strike a flame. I really think the only way I could light them was by lighting a standard match first...:rolleyes:

I like to find big grubs and bite into them just like Bear does. :thumbsup:

I like his attitude, no bsing.

F*** Bear. Les Stroud is the man. :thumbsup:
 

Styx

New member
It's a simple equation... if it walks, crawls, swims, or flies, the odds are in your favor that it's not only safe to eat, but that it will provide you with the nutrition and energy your body needs. If it sits there like... umm... like a plant, the odds are against you both for your own physical safety, and for nutritional content.
:thumbsup: :D

Still a good idea to know what berries and nuts you can eat in an area.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
Back at the dawn of time, before bic lighters were invented, we use to make our own waterproof matches.
All you need is a chunk of paraffin, the kind grandma used to seal her jelly with, and a big box of Ohio Blue Tip strike anywhere matches. Melt the paraffin in a coffee can, dip the matches about half way in, pull them out and let them cool. Matches treated this way are also somewhat wind proof, the paraffin is very flammable and helps keep the match lit. I've been totally soaked and pulled one out of a shirt pocket to light a fire.


Now days I carry a Bic and a mag block in my 10 essentials.


I'll take exception to the advice to get in a low area to camp. Mid way up the lee side of a ridge is better advice IMHO.
 

RARECJ8

Well-known member
well he does have a film crew, support and a chopper ride at a minutes notice. so, yeah, 'almost' fake, hahahahaha...
 

ammowaster

New member


Yeah no kidding

Like when he jumped into the river and used his backpack for "flotation" even though the fool was clearly wearing a PFD under his sweatshirt.

Good way to get some fool to kill himself there Bear:mad:

His show is a good lesson in how not to do stuff. Another one of my favorites was him running full bore through the woods with no light, Moron
 

rusty_tlc

New member
Yeah no kidding

Like when he jumped into the river and used his backpack for "flotation" even though the fool was clearly wearing a PFD under his sweatshirt.

Good way to get some fool to kill himself there Bear:mad:

His show is a good lesson in how not to do stuff.
Another one of my favorites was him running full bore through the woods with no light, Moron
Exactly what my wife said the first time we watched the show. I think he was hiking through the desert at high noon or something stupid like that.
 

TwinStick

New member
Getting back to the myths and this being chukar season...

Does anyone carry rattle snake bite kits? I have a couple with little suction cups and blades. I am not so sure a person could suck all the venom out of a bite before the effects were felt.
 

AtoZ

New member
Everyone has one

Well you know. But his respons about building a shelter at higher elevation. There is a kabatic air flow down gullies, valleys etc... the ideal place is just above this area. Walk up from a valley floor and your notice a change in the temp up slope from the valley floor. No you don't have to set up camp on a ridge line as yes ti can be very breeze up there.
Cheers
 

kairo

Moderator
Staff member
Couple bones to pick:

Matches:
Bring a lighter AND matches. Store them seperately in double ziplocks. I keep my matches in a pill container with a strip of striker material. Matches are usually in my coat pocket, lighter in the pack. If you lose your pack falling into a river, how you gonna start a fire?

Boiling water:
Yes, bringing water to a boil will kill almost all of the bacteria. Sometimes, but not all the time, it won't though. If you're gonna boil it, do at least 5 minutes, 10 is actually required to ensure everything is dead. I boil for two minutes. Better yet, carry iodine tablets in a waterproof container in a ziplock. Put these in your coat pocket too.

Building shelter from dead materials:
Dead materials will actually conserve more heat and are typically easier to harvest (you don't have to have an axe to break a dead limb). You can stuff dead leaves / grass in your shirt or jacket and they will insulate much better than green leaves.

"ALL fur bearing mammals are safe to eat, and will provide you with nutrients and calories."
Properly cooked they are. Err on the side of overcooked. You don't want to get the bubonic plague from eating raw squirrel--yes, the plague still exists.
 
T

toyjota

Guest
I just carry my east german fire starter. If I want flame, pop the cap.
Water does not put the thing out :thumbsup:
 

TwinStick

New member
I used to think road flares were really good to carry around for emergency fire starters. They are okay to use in dry areas but one fateful camping trip during a long down pour changed my mind. The flare itself never burned out but the flame wasn't hot enough to light wet or damp material. Makes sense since they don't burn asphalt, didn't think of that at the time.
 
T

toyjota

Guest
I used to think road flares were really good to carry around for emergency fire starters. They are okay to use in dry areas but one fateful camping trip during a long down pour changed my mind. The flare itself never burned out but the flame wasn't hot enough to light wet or damp material. Makes sense since they don't burn asphalt, didn't think of that at the time.

That's why you need an east german fire starter. You could throw one into a pile of snow and light a wet tree on fire.

I got mine when I did a snow survival training from this place:

http://www.safetyoneinc.com/safetyoneinc-cgi-bin/products?action=display&id=5
 

BIG BLUE

New member
the best survival tactic is this....wheel close to home! :thumbsup: Or better yet just play jeep thrills on the Wii....very safe. I always carry a flame thrower with me in case I need to start a fire. They work good, just make sure you clear everyone out of the way. Crispy frying your copilot is generally frowned upon...unless it was their spotting that put you in the predicament. Also travel with a really fat copilot. They have lots of fat/meat which you can survive of for a long winter if need be. :eek:
 
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