What are things i would need for a long backpacking trip

EAmotorsports

New member
My girl friend wants to do a longback packing trip through Yosemite. the trip would be a week or two long. Im wondering what you guys think we should bring im definitely bringing my climbing gear tent sleep bag food ect. but what are lesser thought about things you guys would bring. im also thinking about getting a spot
 

Black's R&R

New member
My first question for you is have you or yur g/f ever done this kind of trip before? I used to hike alot... then that turned into backpacking....if your experianced its not bad but to think your just gonna throw a pack on and wander for a week plus you could be in for a real shock....climbing gear is great but adds a lot of weight, are you planning on a resupply or are you going to carry everything....either way invest in a good filter....you cant carry enough water for that trip...good maps, gps, good F.A.K....and the knowledge to use it...a spot is a great tool
 

robinsonre

New member
I'll go over a few things that I've forgotten on trips and it has cost me. I'm sure you've got a decent camping list.

You need a GOOD reliable heat source to cook on. Trust me, sometime during that two weeks you're going to want a hot meal. I recommend the MSR whisperlite stoves. The fuel pellets don't work for crap.

You'll probably want a lightweight sleeping mat of some sort. The self inflatable ones are nice, but if you've got a good back you can get by with the super lightweight foam models.

I always recommend a map and compass in case you want to take an off trail hike. Take some time and learn orienteering with a map and compass if you don't know how already.

Water purifier is an ABSOLUTE must. Usually I don't bother with the old school iodine tablets or the new UV systems (they don't work well if the water is kind of murky....honestly I don't think they work very well at all in any case). Invest in a decent hiking filter.

For most backpacking excursions I prefer a head-lamp to a flashlight because it leaves your hands free.

Utility rope (I use 550 cord) is indispensable.

Tent patches of the same fabric and comparable weight to your tent.

Extra shoelaces

GOOD socks. Spend the money, buy the smart wool.



Remember, ounces mean pounds and pounds mean pain. Don't overpack. Really look at each item and ask yourself "In what situation would I use this item" If you don't need it, don't bring it.



The quantity of gear is far less important than the QUALITY of gear that you bring. Backpacking tests your equipment in a way that day-hiking and camping does not. Make sure the stuff you've got will stand up to a week of hard use.

Somewhere around here I've got the total packing list for my last 4 day backpacking trip in Northern California. If you're interested send me a PM and I'll dig it out for you.
 

Gizmatical Fuquad

Well-known member
Premium Member
Have you done anything like this before? If not, the first thing you are gonna need is experience. Start with overnighters and then move up to a few days at a time. You will then start to get an idea of what you need. I spent a few years living out of a back-pack in the woods, but that was a looong time ago. I can't express enough that you need experience first. I don't want to see you in the news.
 

L.D.

New member
I used to back pack and did hike in Yosemite. the bears are vary human savey. I always carried a vile of bleech for my water purifying. I REALY dislike the iodine tablets. I would buy a new pair of tennis shoes for the trip, the rest of the group had special hiking boots and lots of blisters. I never had a blister. you will want some "newskin". my pack was always about 70 lbs, thats heavy. with the newer gear you should be able to cut that down emensly. do not cary canned food, the lighter your food the better, althow I still think a fair supply of trailmix is a must, and jerky. sunflower seeds for the salt as you walk. thats what I can think of off the top of my head.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
Start with this
http://www.amazon.com/Backpacking-One-Step-at-Time/dp/0394729390

I used it 40 years ago to get started backpacking, it has been through numerous revisions to keep it up to date and still a great resource.

Then go out on the interwebs and look for a backpackers forum and ask your question again there. If you want good information go to the right source. This is not to say the members here don't have good information, just that a site dedicated to backpacking might offer better insight from a broader knowledge base.
 

alan71

New member
Packing smart is a priority. Remember, what you pack in, you have to pack out!! As L.D. stated the bears are human savey, and if you have food or garbage that can easily be detected, it becomes their property. Packing out early because of poor planing makes a trip feel like a total waste. Make sure you check the Yosemite website first, it will have all the information you need and when you can backpack through the park. Make sure you check in/out with the rangers for that long of a trip. Don't forget to tell friends and family when you plan to be back and where you will be! Do not make changes to your plan unless you tell those same people. Too many people have made the mistake of not sticking to their plan and have paid the price. Good luck and take bear and mosquito spray!!
 

EAmotorsports

New member
I have done simlar trips to this before but it was 3 days out and then we jut set up oin one place . this time id like to keep moving and we are planning for late spring early summer
 

rusty_tlc

New member
I have done simlar trips to this before but it was 3 days out and then we jut set up oin one place . this time id like to keep moving and we are planning for late spring early summer
How about the GF?
30 years of marriage have taught me "If Momma aint happy nobody aint happy." You WILL have a miserable time if the GF isn't enjoying it.
 

Gizmatical Fuquad

Well-known member
Premium Member
Another good book to reference is Bushcraft, I took a survival class based on this book back in the 80's. The final test for the class was to survive 48 hours with just a good knife and what you were wearing. I highly recommend it.
 

Gizmatical Fuquad

Well-known member
Premium Member
Oh yeah, along the Bushcraft line of thinking, get yourself a really good knife. Not any of the little pocket clip folders, but a good quality big damn knife. When the SHTF I will most likely rely more on my cutlery collection than my gun collection.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
Oh yeah, along the Bushcraft line of thinking, get yourself a really good knife. Not any of the little pocket clip folders, but a good quality big damn knife. When the SHTF I will most likely rely more on my cutlery collection than my gun collection.
I use this knife
http://www.google.com/products/cata...a=X&ei=sZa8TuL9NLDbiAKn9M27Aw&ved=0CFYQ8wIwAQ

You are going backpacking, not homesteading a farm in Alaska. The most use you are likely to see is opening a freeze dried dinner pouch or cutting a piece of paracord.

The Opinel is light, cheap and holds an edge for a long time without sharpening. Actually I have a bunch of them spread out in various trucks and day packs because they are so darn good and cheap to boot.



For a SHTF and car camping I have a KABAR, tough to beat that knife.:cool:
 

rusty_tlc

New member
A hungry 1200lbs bear is also no force to be wreakind with.
If you are worried about bear learn how to avoid having a problem. Good back country habits and a can of pepper spray, no problem.
Again this aint the Alaska wilderness, your not likely to run into a grizzly here.
 
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