What to do when wheeling in really bad weather?

WILLD420

Well-known member
Premium Member
If you've got a hi-lift jack, a shovel and access to some sort of material to fill the ruts, you're never hopelessly stuck.

We've been out and spent 12 or more hours to recover a truck, because we didn't have anyone to come get us, and no way to get a tow truck to where we were. If you can move at all, you're not stuck until you give up.

Different story if you've broken drivetrain parts. If you no longer have at least 1 tire pulling on each end, you may just be hopelessly stuck.

Ditto on the sober part. I can't stand a drunk, even when they are sober.
 

72 Virginians

New member
Staff member
If you've got a hi-lift jack, a shovel and access to some sort of material to fill the ruts, you're never hopelessly stuck.

We've been out and spent 12 or more hours to recover a truck, because we didn't have anyone to come get us, and no way to get a tow truck to where we were. If you can move at all, you're not stuck until you give up.

Different story if you've broken drivetrain parts. If you no longer have at least 1 tire pulling on each end, you may just be hopelessly stuck.

Ditto on the sober part. I can't stand a drunk, even when they are sober.

Then it's on to steps 1 (flail arms around and scream like a girl) and 2 (soil oneself). Unless you're a good lookin' female. Then the steps are: 1. Show cleavage. 2. Wait for male human 3. Watch futile effort to get your vehicle stuck and/or flirt with you.
 

RenoXJ

New member
If you've got a hi-lift jack, a shovel and access to some sort of material to fill the ruts, you're never hopelessly stuck.

We've been out and spent 12 or more hours to recover a truck, because we didn't have anyone to come get us, and no way to get a tow truck to where we were. If you can move at all, you're not stuck until you give up.

Different story if you've broken drivetrain parts. If you no longer have at least 1 tire pulling on each end, you may just be hopelessly stuck.

Ditto on the sober part. I can't stand a drunk, even when they are sober.
Oh man! I was hoping to just call AAA from my satellite phone and fork out some cash to get unstuck.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
If you've got a hi-lift jack, a shovel and access to some sort of material to fill the ruts, you're never hopelessly stuck.

We've been out and spent 12 or more hours to recover a truck, because we didn't have anyone to come get us, and no way to get a tow truck to where we were. If you can move at all, you're not stuck until you give up.

Different story if you've broken drivetrain parts. If you no longer have at least 1 tire pulling on each end, you may just be hopelessly stuck.

Ditto on the sober part. I can't stand a drunk, even when they are sober.
Good points. Another good idea is to do what the Brits do, have a cup of tea. Figuratively anyway. Unless immediate action is called for sometimes the best thing to do is stop, step away from the problem and then come back to it. It's amazing how often this makes you see things in a new light.
 

Spence621

New member
I have a hilift and shovel/axe and junk, but no where to use the lift on my stocker 4runner....I see this as an issue. And I bought the jack for $20 at el rancho flea market haha.
 

WILLD420

Well-known member
Premium Member
Ditto on the whole thinking it out and taking a moment.

We got a semi stuck more than once in ankle deep slime on a ranch we used to have. Since it was late October/November time, all we had to do was shut it down and wait till the next morning when it was frosted over. Drove it right out as long as it was frozen.

For guys that run highway tread or A/T type tires, a set of old tire chains can make all the difference when it comes to snow that's been melted and re-frozen, or slimy mud that you just can't get a grip in.
 

Spence621

New member
Definitely a real hilift, a bit neglected by the previous owner, but a little wd-40 good as new haha. Thanks for the suggestions.
 

trainwreck

New member
Ditto on the whole thinking it out and taking a moment.

We got a semi stuck more than once in ankle deep slime on a ranch we used to have. Since it was late October/November time, all we had to do was shut it down and wait till the next morning when it was frosted over. Drove it right out as long as it was frozen.

For guys that run highway tread or A/T type tires, a set of old tire chains can make all the difference when it comes to snow that's been melted and re-frozen, or slimy mud that you just can't get a grip in.

x2 on the chains. but not just for people with A/T's! run chains on off road tires, if they dont have the size you need have some made. most times we've been stuck the chains dug down to frozen dirt and we got out within 10 minutes.
 

WILLD420

Well-known member
Premium Member
Jack up the wheel, throw the chains on the top of the tire if open diff, under if it's l/s or locked. Wrap it around the tire, hook it in place, get it as tight as you can using whatever pry tool you can find, or ratchet straps. Then go easy till you check the tightness again.

It's a real PITA to put chains on after you are already buried, but it can be done and it's easier than a tow bill or freezing to death.

A good trick for you guys with Uber big tires, Semi-Truck chains. They aren't wide enough for the 44" crowd, but they are plenty big for most 12.50 width tires. They are very beefy and you can abuse the crap out of them with a jeep or truck and hardly ever break one.

We used to chain up all 4 tires on our truck with a 4-horse trailer with 5 horses in it, then proceed to hammer it to the floor 20-30 miles just to get to where we needed to go. With regular duty chains, we could rip a set to shreds in a few minutes. With Semi chains, we used the same ones for 10 years, rarely ever repairing one.

We would even chain up and run them on the dry roads when we couldn't get enough traction due to the ankle deep gravel they liked to put down on the roads.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
....

A good trick for you guys with Uber big tires, Semi-Truck chains. They aren't wide enough for the 44" crowd, but they are plenty big for most 12.50 width tires. They are very beefy and you can abuse the crap out of them with a jeep or truck and hardly ever break one....

My son ran Super Singles on his tractor for a while, the chains for those are pretty wide. I'm thinking they would fit a lot of the tall rubber I've seen on the trail.

Anybody remember twp years ago when I-80 E was littered with truck chains from Truckee to Verdi? I wish I had snagged a few, I didn't know at the time but it's fairly easy to re-work real chains to fit a different size tire. Well fairly easy if you have more time than money.:D
 

CashMoney

I piss excellence.
My son ran Super Singles on his tractor for a while, the chains for those are pretty wide. I'm thinking they would fit a lot of the tall rubber I've seen on the trail.

Anybody remember twp years ago when I-80 E was littered with truck chains from Truckee to Verdi? I wish I had snagged a few, I didn't know at the time but it's fairly easy to re-work real chains to fit a different size tire. Well fairly easy if you have more time than money.:D
I got the pliers for the links too....
 

GloNDark

Active member
Now that the snow is starting to fly, I spent yesterday adjusting my tool box on the truck for the colder weather.

In addition to my normal tools, spare parts, straps, coleman stove, high lift and spade shovel I added the following:
- 2 person Tent
- 1 huge sleeping bag
- 4 Space blankets
- 2 more tarps
- 2 extra 50ft ropes
- Added an aluminum snow shovel
- 2 more small propane bottles (4 total)
- Winter Jumpsuit
- Extra socks and pants
- 2 packs of flares
- a bunch of hand/foot warmer packs

I also spent some time yesterday adding some more lights to the rig as well as the normal season is changing maintenance (Oil change, coolant check, nut and bolt check) I like to be overly prepared, especially in the snow. I won't even drive my Cummins over the hill to Sac in the winter without snow shovels, sleeping bags and supplies.
 

WILLD420

Well-known member
Premium Member
Now that the snow is starting to fly, I spent yesterday adjusting my tool box on the truck for the colder weather.

In addition to my normal tools, spare parts, straps, coleman stove, high lift and spade shovel I added the following:
- 2 person Tent
- 1 huge sleeping bag
- 4 Space blankets
- 2 more tarps
- 2 extra 50ft ropes
- Added an aluminum snow shovel
- 2 more small propane bottles (4 total)
- Winter Jumpsuit
- Extra socks and pants
- 2 packs of flares
- a bunch of hand/foot warmer packs

I also spent some time yesterday adding some more lights to the rig as well as the normal season is changing maintenance (Oil change, coolant check, nut and bolt check) I like to be overly prepared, especially in the snow. I won't even drive my Cummins over the hill to Sac in the winter without snow shovels, sleeping bags and supplies.

On Diesel rigs, a small piece of plastic with a hole in the center can be put over the radiator to keep them warmer. You have to have a little airflow through the center so the fan clutch works right.
 

Bitosin

New member
Now that the snow is starting to fly, I spent yesterday adjusting my tool box on the truck for the colder weather.

In addition to my normal tools, spare parts, straps, coleman stove, high lift and spade shovel I added the following:
- 2 person Tent
- 1 huge sleeping bag
- 4 Space blankets
- 2 more tarps
- 2 extra 50ft ropes
- Added an aluminum snow shovel
- 2 more small propane bottles (4 total)
- Winter Jumpsuit
- Extra socks and pants
- 2 packs of flares
- a bunch of hand/foot warmer packs

I also spent some time yesterday adding some more lights to the rig as well as the normal season is changing maintenance (Oil change, coolant check, nut and bolt check) I like to be overly prepared, especially in the snow. I won't even drive my Cummins over the hill to Sac in the winter without snow shovels, sleeping bags and supplies.

Now that you have everything and are ready for any emergency, where do you put all that stuff and still have room for people ???
 
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