What to do when wheeling in really bad weather?

GloNDark

Active member
Now that you have everything and are ready for any emergency, where do you put all that stuff and still have room for people ???

Cross bed tool box with a custom box under it. Still have room for the wife and kid in the cab and the dog in the bed.

With a little planning it works great. But I do love the pick up bed of the yota.
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thedevl

New member
I have found my little 18" chain saw to be indespensible when wheeling in bad weather. I have been stuck in several feet of snow, miles away from any help and my chain saw saved me as I was able to find a dead tree, cut a stump for the Hi-lift, and also planks to put under the tires to drive out.
 

BurbanHunter

New member
I have found my little 18" chain saw to be indespensible when wheeling in bad weather. I have been stuck in several feet of snow, miles away from any help and my chain saw saved me as I was able to find a dead tree, cut a stump for the Hi-lift, and also planks to put under the tires to drive out.

That's a pretty good idea! I would've never thought about a chainsaw as "crappy weather" gear, but if the shoe fits...
 

WILLD420

Well-known member
Premium Member
Glad you brought that up. I totally forgot about carrying one. I bought a little one from Home Depot on sale just for carrying in the back of my rig. Don't buy an older used one if you can afford to get a newer one. The old ones leak all the gas/oil out.

Carrying Gas in a Qt. oil jug works pretty well. Rarely do you need more than 1 Qt of fuel for what you could need in a 1 day run as long as you start with a full tank on the saw. If you have to carry an empty saw, then 2 Qts would probably do about anything you would run across, including making a small cabin or cutting down a bunch of dead trees.
 

Bugman

New member
[threadjack] I tire of this 'never wheel alone' horse-puckey. I do more than 80% of my wheelin' solo and often it's solo with my kids. Irregardless of weather and terrain, the MOST important thing is to know your capabilities as a driver, next is to know the capabilities of your rig, lastly, make sure you have communication with civilization should you mis-judge the prior mentioned capabilities.[/threadjack]

Yeah, we've seen you "horse-pucky who wheel alone with your kids" guys before. We pulled a dad's and one son's bodies from an overturned rig a couple days after the accident. The only boy left alive was 4 years old, cold and in shock. Fact is, mother nature can kick your ass in a split second no matter how capable you think you or your rig is. The one positive outcome of this is that this idiot won't be able to kill his surviving child.
 

Styx

New member
I've done quite a bit of wheeling on my own, but I don't push my limits and I don't have my kids with me. Always let someone know where you are within a mile area max., when you'll be back, etc. Same thing I'd do if I was hiking alone.
 

GloNDark

Active member
I've done quite a bit of wheeling on my own, but I don't push my limits and I don't have my kids with me. Always let someone know where you are within a mile area max., when you'll be back, etc. Same thing I'd do if I was hiking alone.

I do a lot of solo wheeling and exploring. Sometimes I bring my son with me, sometimes not. Basical rules are always in place like Andrew said.

- Let people know where you are going
- When you will be back
- Check the weather
- Be prepared

I don't like to wheel in big groups of people. Always turns to more drama and bs. So even when i'm with a group it's small. 3 to 5 rigs max. I've got a small group of guys that I wheel with and I know they are just as prepare and in some cases more prepared tham I am.
 

POOR BOY

New member
I do a lot of solo wheeling and exploring. Sometimes I bring my son with me, sometimes not. Basical rules are always in place like Andrew said.

- Let people know where you are going
- When you will be back
- Check the weather
- Be prepared

I don't like to wheel in big groups of people. Always turns to more drama and bs. So even when i'm with a group it's small. 3 to 5 rigs max. I've got a small group of guys that I wheel with and I know they are just as prepare and in some cases more prepared tham I am.

20oz bottle for tempurary fuel tank. you bet
 

Toyota Guy

Active member
Well, I see your first mistake you forgot to pack your 44" boggers.
Are we talking buried to the frame in bottomless mud, solo, with no cell service, 10 miles from pavement, and another 70 miles after that to the nearest town, with the wife and no beer stuck?


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Never been there.:rolleyes:
 

RARECJ8

Well-known member
I always carry a water proof 'go' bag on winter runs with most of the stuff Glo mentions, but one thing i for sure will have is a thermos of hot coffee or maybe soup. If its all not consumed, it helps to pour over the manual hubs if they are glazed with ice.
 

rusty_tlc

New member
Well, I see your first mistake you forgot to pack your 44" boggers.

That was many years ago, and yet, my wife brought it up again when we were up in the hills cutting trees last weekend. The roads weren't even that muddy.

Wimmens have long memories. :rolleyes:
 
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